When Does Child Support End in Ohio?

Child support plays an important role in creating financial stability for children after a divorce or separation of parents. In Ohio, responsibility for the payment of child support ends or can be terminated for a number of reasons.

The State of Ohio expects both parents to provide financial support for their children. While either parent can support their child financially for as long as they want, court-ordered child support ends when a child reaches milestones that include:

  • Graduation from high school: Child support does not automatically end when a child turns 18, unless the child is no longer attending an accredited high school. The state recognizes that many children are still attending high school when their 18th birthday passes.For that reason, child support is not terminated until a child graduates from an accredited high school.
  • Military service: If a child enlists in the Armed Services, a child support order can be ended.
  • Changes in child custody: If a court-ordered change in custody occurs, the obligation of child support may shift or terminate. This may also occur if the child is legally adopted, or emancipated.
  • Marriage: When a child marries, the obligation of child support can be terminated.
  • Deportation: If a child is deported from the US, court-order child support can be halted.
  • Death: If a child passes away, child support ends. The obligation of paying child support also ends if the parent who was paying child support dies.

Short of terminating a child-support order, Ohio also allows legal guardians to apply for a review of their child support payments under certain conditions.

Applying to alter your child support order if your financial condition changes

For many reasons, you may experience an inability to pay your child support obligation through no fault of your own. If you are unemployed, or laid off for at least 30 consecutive days, you can apply for a review and adjustment of your child support obligation.

In addition, the financial circumstances of both parents are reviewed every 36 months in the event there has been a considerable change in the financial stability of either party.

Reductions in child support have a ripple effect and could cause financial instability if you are the parent who receives child support. An adjustment to the child support order is not guaranteed and either party has a short window of time to object to an application to change the child support orders in their case. As it currently stands, child support agencies cannot award a deviation from the calculated support amount, even if the parties agree and even if it is already a part of your court order.

Whether you pay or receive child support, if either party applies for an upward or downward adjustment, it is a good idea to speak with an Ohio child support attorney who has experience with post-judgment child support and other divorce issues.

Experienced Family Law Attorneys Serving Waverly and Chillicothe

Providing trusted advice to clients in Southern Ohio, Seif & McNamee, LLC delivers committed, skilled legal service when you have questions about child support, child custody, or divorce. Call 740.835.4882 or contact us today to discuss your case, or set up a consultation. We look forward to meeting you at our conveniently located offices in Chillicothe and Waverly.